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outlawsam

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Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #1 
So i was rebuilding my outlaw and it has the stupid timing chain without a master link. So i had to break the chain. Anyways come to find out the master link isn't big enough and no one sells a half link, obviously. The question is how hard of a job is it to change the whole timing chain? Will i have to crack the case to get to it? Could i fish it down from the cylinder head? Thanks guys!
dirtyworks

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #2 
I've recently replaced the cam timing chain on my 2011 525 and it's really pretty simple. You'll need the flywheel puller, an impact gun, and a chain breaker/riveter.

>Start by draining the oil, and taking the head cover off (the part on top that the cam rockers are on).
>Remove the cam tensioner by first removing the spring (middle bolt), then the 2 holding it onto the block.
>Then take the left side cover off, disconnecting the cable coming from the stator as well. There's the magneto, so hold a firm grip on the cover.
>Next use the impact gun to remove the nut holding the flywheel. If you don't have an impact gun, you'll have to either use the clutch stopper tool thing, or stick some rope into the combustion chamber via spark plug hole.
>Once the flywheel is removed, there's a black plastic thing guarding the bottom of the chain (also screening debris from the crank area). Remove this with the 2 bolts.

>At this stage you should be able to see both ends - top and bottom - of the chain.

Simply break the chain at the top, making sure not to lose the rivet inside the motor. Also, don't immediately drop the chain. Once the chain was broken, I used string to tie the new chain to the old one, so I can lead it through the channels. Feed it through, so that the new chain is basically on (minus riveting, ofc).

>Now you have to find top dead center. Don't worry, it's pretty easy when the motor is stripped to this point.
>TDC for the crankshaft is where the woodroofe key is that the flywheel was connected to. Remember to line it up with the piston/cylinder, and NOT the bike.
>To find TDC with the cam, the big cam timing gear (that the chain was driving) has 2 holes or indents (I don't remember which) exactly opposite each other. These line up with the top of the head. Make sure that you can see the decompression lever on top (note: it's not exactly at the top, but slightly forward).

Keep in mind that getting top dead center is the trickiest part of this job, and also the most important. It's worth taking your time to do it right.

Once you think you have it right, slightly turn the crankshaft (flywheel shaft) counter-clockwise, to pull the chain taught. Check to make sure everything still lines up. The side the chain tensioner is on should be loose, while the side of the chain pulling on the cam gear is tight. This is how they line up while the motor is running.

>Now that you've got top dead center, rivet the chain together (I used youtube videos to learn how). It's exactly the same as riveting a drive chain, only this is much smaller.

>Put everything back together. You'll have to adjust the valve clearances again, as you've just fucked them up by removing the valve/head cover.

outlawsam

Registered:
Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtyworks
I've recently replaced the cam timing chain on my 2011 525 and it's really pretty simple. You'll need the flywheel puller, an impact gun, and a chain breaker/riveter.

>Start by draining the oil, and taking the head cover off (the part on top that the cam rockers are on).
>Remove the cam tensioner by first removing the spring (middle bolt), then the 2 holding it onto the block.
>Then take the left side cover off, disconnecting the cable coming from the stator as well. There's the magneto, so hold a firm grip on the cover.
>Next use the impact gun to remove the nut holding the flywheel. If you don't have an impact gun, you'll have to either use the clutch stopper tool thing, or stick some rope into the combustion chamber via spark plug hole.
>Once the flywheel is removed, there's a black plastic thing guarding the bottom of the chain (also screening debris from the crank area). Remove this with the 2 bolts.

>At this stage you should be able to see both ends - top and bottom - of the chain.

Simply break the chain at the top, making sure not to lose the rivet inside the motor. Also, don't immediately drop the chain. Once the chain was broken, I used string to tie the new chain to the old one, so I can lead it through the channels. Feed it through, so that the new chain is basically on (minus riveting, ofc).

>Now you have to find top dead center. Don't worry, it's pretty easy when the motor is stripped to this point.
>TDC for the crankshaft is where the woodroofe key is that the flywheel was connected to. Remember to line it up with the piston/cylinder, and NOT the bike.
>To find TDC with the cam, the big cam timing gear (that the chain was driving) has 2 holes or indents (I don't remember which) exactly opposite each other. These line up with the top of the head. Make sure that you can see the decompression lever on top (note: it's not exactly at the top, but slightly forward).

Keep in mind that getting top dead center is the trickiest part of this job, and also the most important. It's worth taking your time to do it right.

Once you think you have it right, slightly turn the crankshaft (flywheel shaft) counter-clockwise, to pull the chain taught. Check to make sure everything still lines up. The side the chain tensioner is on should be loose, while the side of the chain pulling on the cam gear is tight. This is how they line up while the motor is running.

>Now that you've got top dead center, rivet the chain together (I used youtube videos to learn how). It's exactly the same as riveting a drive chain, only this is much smaller.

>Put everything back together. You'll have to adjust the valve clearances again, as you've just fucked them up by removing the valve/head cover.


Thanks that fixed her
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